Rusty Fenton: His inspiration and friendship will be missed

Rusty Fenton and Case D. Fischer at the National Association of Specialty Food Trades, 1997 holding the Gold sofi award for The Original Roasted Raspberry Chipotle Sauce

Rusty Fenton and Case D. Fischer at the National Association of Specialty Food Trades, 1997 holding the Gold sofi award for The Original Roasted Raspberry Chipotle Sauce

It is with utmost sadness I share with you the loss of my dear friend, Rusty Fenton.

Rusty and I became friends in the late ‘80s when he had started a praline business. We both were “foodies” and had a passion for entrepreneurship. He is in that small group of friends who would do anything for you without question! Rusty was always there for me—in good times and especially in bad! And I will miss the “safe” feeling I got when talking to and being with him.

Many of you who love our products have a connection with Rusty. It was Rusty I would send my products to for feedback and it was Rusty who said to me when I was working on a new raspberry sauce, “Case, why don’t you add chipotle peppers to that?”

Well, in 1995 hardly anyone even knew what a chipotle pepper was—including me.  He explained the flavor of it to me—and skeptically, I tried his suggestion.  As you know, it was magic!  The Original Roasted Raspberry Chipotle Sauce® became our best seller overnight and remains so today.

That is just one of many helping hands Rusty gave to me and Fischer & Wieser, and I can say we would not be where we are without that, and many other “Rusty ideas” and help  through our years of friendship.

Rusty, thank you so much for everything you did for me and all the other people you inspired over the years. I will miss that “safe” feeling I had with you but I know you are busy opening your next Rusty Taco in Heaven! I can only imagine how good they will taste up there!

God bless and farewell!

Case Fischer

 

 

 

What is a chipotle pepper?

Chipotle Peppers – smoked red jalapeño peppers

We get asked this question so much, we decided to post our definition. Put simply, they’re smoked jalapeño peppers.

Jalapeño peppers are mostly grown in Mexico, New Mexico, and Texas. On the Scoville scale (a scale for measuring the heat in peppers devised by Wilbur Scoville, a pharmacist, in 1912), they rank between 2500-10,000 SHU (Scoville Heat Units). This means that a chipotle pepper  is relatively mild in comparison to a pure capsicum which tops the scale at 15-16 million units.

Jalapeño peppers originated in Mexico in a town in Veracruz called Xalapa–hence the name, jalapeño. The plants are about 2.5 to 3 feet high and produce 25-30 plants per season. Growers pick several times throughout the season; the red, unripened peppers are chosen to be smoked to make chipotles (pronounced chee-POTE-lays).

How are they smoked?
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